Kaitlin Snider

Advisor: Karl Obrietan
Alumni

 

Research:

Broadly, I am interested in the mechanisms used by the circadian clock to influence behavior on a daily basis.  My research investigates the dynamic interactions between circadian clocks, cell signaling mechanisms, and behavior.  I combine transgenic mouse models with pharmacological and photic manipulations to perturb the circadian clock, and investigate the subsequent changes - cellular and molecular level changes as well as behavioral changes.

Awards:

2013 - University Fellowship, The Ohio State University

Presentations:

“Divergent effects of circadian rhythms on different learning and memory processes” Kaitlin Snider, Jarrod Fyie, Kari Hoyt, and Karl Obrietan. Poster presentation. OSU Life Sciences Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Symposium. Columbus, OH. 23 May 2017.

“Forebrain Bmal1 deletion abrogates time-of-day dependent learning and memory” Kaitlin Snider, Heather Dziema, Sydney Aten, Jacob Loeser, Frances Norona, Kari Hoyt, and Karl Obrietan. Oral presentation, Circadian Rhythms: Timely Topics Nanosymposium. Society for Neuroscience 46th Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA. 13 Nov 2016.
 
“Clocks and Cognition: The effect of hippocampal circadian rhythms on learning and memory” Kaitlin Snider, Heather Dziema, Sydney Aten, Jacob Loeser, Frances Norona, Kari Hoyt, and Karl Obrietan. Invited seminar. University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire Biology Department Seminar Series. Eau Claire, WI. 13 Oct 2016. Invited seminar. College of Wooster Life Sciences Seminar Series. Wooster, OH. 29 Sept 2016.
 
“Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene BMAL1 in forebrain circuits” Kaitlin Snider, Heather Dziema, Sydney Aten, Jacob Loeser, Frances Norona, and Karl Obrietan Oral presentation. OSU Life Sciences Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Symposium. Columbus, OH. 18 May 2016.
 

Kaitlin Snider, Katelin Hansen, Heather Dziema, Jacob Loeser, Sydney Aten, Ian Sanchez, Carl Pelz, Soren Impey, and Karl Obrietan. “Circadian clock timing in forebrain neuronal circuits contributes to the daily rhythm in learning and memory.” Poster session presented at: Annual Ohio State University ‐ Wexner Medical Center Trainee Research Day; 2015 Apr 15‐16; Columbus, OH.

Areas of Expertise
  • Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
Education
  • BS in Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
 

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Phone:
(614) 292-4420
4030 Graves Hall
333 W. 10th Avenue
Columbus, OH  43210